Play this talk Download this talk in MP3 format Order this talk on CD for £5.00 including postage and packing Read a transcript of this talk
Listen to today’s talk: Destiny and Fate
beingtrulyhuman.orgBeing Truly Human
To listen to talks while browsing our website, please enable Flash or HTML 5 in your browser — click here to find out how
Talks play in the Media Player at the top of the page — you can continue to browse our website while you listen
Items have been added to your shopping cart — click here to view it and complete your order

Zarathushtra: The Transcendental Vision

By Phiroz Mehta
Foreword by Professor Noel Q. King

Cover of Zarathushtra: The Transcendental Vision

About this book

Format Paperback
Pages 128
Publisher Element Books
Published 1985
ISBN0-906540-68-2

The Zarathushtrians (or Zoroastrians) have handed down scriptures which, among the revealed religions, are perhaps the oldest in the world continuously in use. Their literature is correspondingly among the most venerable in any Indo-European tongue. Ideas associated with Zarathushtrianism, especially the monotheistic concept, influenced the basic thinking of Judaism, Mahayana Buddhism, Christianity and Islam – they have influenced the psyche of over half the human race.

Zarathushtra’s exact dates are uncertain, but he is known to have lived in Ancient Iran between 1400 BC and 800 BC. He experienced his first vision of Ahura-Mazda – Lord of Life and Wisdom – when he was about thirty. His Gathas (‘Songs’), expressed as a result of his communion with the supreme deity, form the heart of the Avesta, the sacred scriptures.

The author of this book, Phiroz Mehta, was born of Parsi parents and brought up in the Zarathushtrian tradition. He seeks here to convey the nature of the transcendental vision of the Perfected Holy Ones, in particular as proclaimed by Zarathushtra. His theme describes the mode and implications of holistic consciousness – the context of infinity and eternity – wherein the finite and temporal may commingle with the immortal, the divine. Through such inspiration, man may realize fully-integrated perfection.